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William Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Love, according to one of the most remarkable writers the world has seen, is not just about a sparkle in the eye, or roses, and other pretty things. In his comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare takes on love and its complexities in a world of royalty and magic.

Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Before JK Rowling became one of the greatest storytellers of the world, there was a fellow from Great Britain named Geoffrey Chaucer who told a couple of tales and found his rightful place in the world of literature. Created in the 14th century, his tales gave a reflection of his times. So if you want to know what knights were really like, among many other things, join the travel to Canterbury! The Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories made by a group of pilgrims on their way to Canterbury, England to honor St. Thomas Becket. This group agrees to tell two stories each on the way to Canterbury and then another two on their way back. The best storyteller earns a prize.

John Milton: Paradise Lost

One of 17th centurys most notable pieces of literature, John Miltons Paradise Lost takes on the story behind humankinds first disobedience resulting in the banishment of Adam and Eve from paradise. Throughout the epic poem, Satan is set in different positions that underline his constant efforts to be in battle with God in order to defeat Him eventually. At the beginning of the story, Satan, together with other fallen angels, creates Pandemonium in hell to serve somewhat like their home turf, their headquarters wherein they decide to destroy humankind as their assault.

Dante Alighieri: The Divine Comedy

Hell might be an interesting place after all. It is filled with action and brewing with intensity, at the very least. In Inferno, the third part of Dante Alighieri�s The Divine Comedy, the author thoughtfully creates a vivid picture of what hell looks like. In this book and in the Italian writer�s mind, it is a place where his enemies deserve their rightful place and where people serve their punishments for what they did on earth.

George Eliot: Daniel Deronda

Still controversial even in the modern age, George Eliot's victorian novel Daniel Deronda is a pleasurable read for that much awaited weekend. First published in 1876, this was the last completed novel of English novelist, journalist, and translator Mary Anne Evans who was better known for her pen name George Eliot.

Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray

Its eloquent. Its beautiful. Its rich. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is a must-read for any book lover. Celebrated for his epigrams, plays, and other groundbreaking works, Oscar Wilde is an Irish writer and poet who became one of the most popular playwrights during the early 1890s. The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel by Wilde, which first appeared as a lead story in Lippincotts Monthly Magazine on June 1890. An amended version was published in April 1891 through Ward, Lock and Company. The most recent adaptation of this work was a film entitled Dorian Gray, directed by Oliver Parker and stars Ben Barnes.

L. Frank Baum: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

Treat yourself to a quick read with one of the handful classics that almost everyone is familiar with, L. Frank Baums The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Lyman L. Frank Baum is an American author of childrens book who wrote over 55 novels (plus 4 missing ones) , 82 short stories, over 200 poems, and a lot of scripts. His most famous work and the first book in his sequel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was originally published on May 17, 1900 and had been reprinted a dozen of times under the title Wizard of Oz. The story has already been re-envisioned through stage plays, musicals, and a well-known film version starring the amazing Judy Garland.