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William Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Love, according to one of the most remarkable writers the world has seen, is not just about a sparkle in the eye, or roses, and other pretty things. In his comedy A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare takes on love and its complexities in a world of royalty and magic.

E.M. Forster: A Room with a View

Whats more comforting than a good book for a cozy evening? Cuddle up and download E.M. Forsters most celebrated classic, A Room with a View. Edward Morgan Forster was an English novelist and short story writer best known for his works that examines class difference and hypocrisy in early 20th century British society. Through his lifetime, he had published five novels including Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), Howards End (1910), and A Passage to India (1924). Maurice (1971) was published shortly after the writers death.

Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice

Engross in classic romance stories with Jane Austens perennially popular novel, Pride and Prejudice. Considered as one of the most popular author in English literature, Jane Austens stories of romantic fiction were widely spread and praised. She also gained historical importance with her realism and strong social commentaries. Pride and Prejudice was first published in 1813. Set in the English countryside at the end of the 18th century, the novel tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet as she skillfully moves her way among issues on manners, morality, education and marriage in a tightly-knit and old-fashioned society.

Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Before JK Rowling became one of the greatest storytellers of the world, there was a fellow from Great Britain named Geoffrey Chaucer who told a couple of tales and found his rightful place in the world of literature. Created in the 14th century, his tales gave a reflection of his times. So if you want to know what knights were really like, among many other things, join the travel to Canterbury! The Canterbury Tales is a collection of 24 stories made by a group of pilgrims on their way to Canterbury, England to honor St. Thomas Becket. This group agrees to tell two stories each on the way to Canterbury and then another two on their way back. The best storyteller earns a prize.

John Milton: Paradise Lost

One of 17th centurys most notable pieces of literature, John Miltons Paradise Lost takes on the story behind humankinds first disobedience resulting in the banishment of Adam and Eve from paradise. Throughout the epic poem, Satan is set in different positions that underline his constant efforts to be in battle with God in order to defeat Him eventually. At the beginning of the story, Satan, together with other fallen angels, creates Pandemonium in hell to serve somewhat like their home turf, their headquarters wherein they decide to destroy humankind as their assault.

Dante Alighieri: The Divine Comedy

Hell might be an interesting place after all. It is filled with action and brewing with intensity, at the very least. In Inferno, the third part of Dante Alighieri�s The Divine Comedy, the author thoughtfully creates a vivid picture of what hell looks like. In this book and in the Italian writer�s mind, it is a place where his enemies deserve their rightful place and where people serve their punishments for what they did on earth.

George Eliot: Daniel Deronda

Still controversial even in the modern age, George Eliot's victorian novel Daniel Deronda is a pleasurable read for that much awaited weekend. First published in 1876, this was the last completed novel of English novelist, journalist, and translator Mary Anne Evans who was better known for her pen name George Eliot.

F. Scott Fitzgerald: This Side of Paradise

Enjoy a classical read with This Side of Paradise, an enjoyable novel who established F. Scott Fitzgerald as the golden boy of Jazz Age. Written when he was only twenty three, this is a semiautobiographical tale of Amory Blaine, a handsome and optimistic Princeton University student who slowly undergoes an adolescent indirection. This was portrayed by his sudden disillusionment, his war experience, and his failed relationship with a New York debutante who then breaks his heart for a wealthier man.